The Pink Problem

September 10, 2015 Written By Paushali Roy

It is easy to look up definitions of feminism and patriarchy on the internet.  However, comprehending the impact patriarchy has on women can be quite harrowing. And by women, I refer to ALL of them, including educated, financially-sound, ‘modern’ women.

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So instead of narrating experiences of an entire lifetime, I will be sharing the results of a simple social experiment that I carried out. So the experiment was as follows:

50 women, belonging to SEC A1-A2, were asked what their favourite colour was and why.That’s all. Really.

Results:

17 women stated pink as their favourite colour. However, for 14 out of the 17, the reason for this was-

“Pink is a feminine colour.”

“Women usually like pink.”

“Obviously, I’m a woman.”

And so on.

3 out of the 14 stated reasons like-

“It really looks good on me.”

“Reminds me of my baby’s room.”

“It’s bright without being loud.”

For comparison, women who picked colours like green, yellow, blue, red and others, stated reasons like-

“Blue looks very good on me.”

“Red reminds me of my wedding saree.”

“White stands for clarity and class.”

“Green feels fresh and peaceful.”

“Yellow makes me feel very bright and happy.”

And so on.

Image Source

Inference

  1. Every woman’s favourite colour is not pink LOL. (Yes, that was a passive-aggressive LOL)
  1. 28% of women in the experiment  (14 out of 50) and 82% of those who chose pink (14 out of 17), had designated their favourite colour on the basis of what they thought was socially appropriate, while others recounted personal experiences and emotions for their choice.

A choice as personal as one’s favourite colour may also be dictated by patriarchy. As harmless as it may seem, the implications of this simple trend may be devastating, as “girls like pink” isn’t the only stereotype that is fed to girls at very young ages. There are several others, like-

“Girls are delicate and emotional.”

“Girls need to feel protected.”

“Girls are always forgiving.”

“Girls don’t talk loudly.”

“Girls don’t play/watch sports.”

“Girls can’t drive.”

“Girls don’t smoke cigarettes.”

And so on and on and on and….. (Sigh)

So if you think most women you’ve met are nervous, insecure and low on confidence, or that most women you’ve met don’t watch football, and drive, it’s because of what patriarchy makes them believe about themselves. They’ve heard these stereotypes so often that they’ve never doubted their validity.

It takes tremendous effort for a woman to unlearn the lessons of patriarchy to do something as simple as speak up for herself.

And this is why the feminists are raging.

The Pink Problem

September 10, 2015 Written By Paushali Roy

It is easy to look up definitions of feminism and patriarchy on the internet.  However, comprehending the impact patriarchy has on women can be quite harrowing. And by women, I refer to ALL of them, including educated, financially-sound, ‘modern’ women.

Image Source

So instead of narrating experiences of an entire lifetime, I will be sharing the results of a simple social experiment that I carried out. So the experiment was as follows:

50 women, belonging to SEC A1-A2, were asked what their favourite colour was and why.That’s all. Really.

Results:

17 women stated pink as their favourite colour. However, for 14 out of the 17, the reason for this was-

“Pink is a feminine colour.”

“Women usually like pink.”

“Obviously, I’m a woman.”

And so on.

3 out of the 14 stated reasons like-

“It really looks good on me.”

“Reminds me of my baby’s room.”

“It’s bright without being loud.”

For comparison, women who picked colours like green, yellow, blue, red and others, stated reasons like-

“Blue looks very good on me.”

“Red reminds me of my wedding saree.”

“White stands for clarity and class.”

“Green feels fresh and peaceful.”

“Yellow makes me feel very bright and happy.”

And so on.

Image Source

Inference

  1. Every woman’s favourite colour is not pink LOL. (Yes, that was a passive-aggressive LOL)
  1. 28% of women in the experiment  (14 out of 50) and 82% of those who chose pink (14 out of 17), had designated their favourite colour on the basis of what they thought was socially appropriate, while others recounted personal experiences and emotions for their choice.

A choice as personal as one’s favourite colour may also be dictated by patriarchy. As harmless as it may seem, the implications of this simple trend may be devastating, as “girls like pink” isn’t the only stereotype that is fed to girls at very young ages. There are several others, like-

“Girls are delicate and emotional.”

“Girls need to feel protected.”

“Girls are always forgiving.”

“Girls don’t talk loudly.”

“Girls don’t play/watch sports.”

“Girls can’t drive.”

“Girls don’t smoke cigarettes.”

And so on and on and on and….. (Sigh)

So if you think most women you’ve met are nervous, insecure and low on confidence, or that most women you’ve met don’t watch football, and drive, it’s because of what patriarchy makes them believe about themselves. They’ve heard these stereotypes so often that they’ve never doubted their validity.

It takes tremendous effort for a woman to unlearn the lessons of patriarchy to do something as simple as speak up for herself.

And this is why the feminists are raging.

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